Agreement Between States Is

[33] No. Bancorp, Inc. v. Bd. of the Governors of the Fed. Reserve System, 472 U.S. 159, 176 (1985). An example of such a covenant would be one that covers a subject that concerns all States, but that allows only certain States to be parties to it. Buenger et al., a.a.O.

Note 2, at 69. However, due to the increase in administrative functions at the State level, intergovernmental covenants have developed and contain rules and procedures for the management of activities under this legislation. [45] The Council of Governments of the Länder[46] recommends the establishment of an intergovernmental authority to “ensure accountability, training, compliance, enforcement, regulation, collection and exchange of information, as well as the general staff to make the [pact] a success”. [47] Since pacts are drafted in the form of contracts, states negotiating contracts involving the establishment of an intergovernmental agency are free to determine what rules should be established with respect to the management of that agency. Although the U.S. Constitution contains an explicit requirement for Congressional approval of interstate pacts, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that certain state-to-state agreements do not require such agreement from Congress. Article I, Section 10 of the Constitution provides that “[any] State without the consent of Congress,. . .

Enter into an agreement or pact with another State. [14] However, in 1893, the Court of Justice rendered its report in Virginia. . . .